Car accessibility – Taxis 4 Smart Cities http://taxis4smartcities.org/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 13:42:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://taxis4smartcities.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-05T160153.519.png Car accessibility – Taxis 4 Smart Cities http://taxis4smartcities.org/ 32 32 May Mobility and Via Launch First Rural Transit Program to Use Self-Driving Wheelchair-Accessible ADA Compliant Vehicles https://taxis4smartcities.org/may-mobility-and-via-launch-first-rural-transit-program-to-use-self-driving-wheelchair-accessible-ada-compliant-vehicles/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/may-mobility-and-via-launch-first-rural-transit-program-to-use-self-driving-wheelchair-accessible-ada-compliant-vehicles/ The Grand Rapids, Minn. The service is accessible by design and will demonstrate how AVs achieve their greatest impact when used for public transport – even in rural and winter environments. GRAND RAPIDS, Minn., September 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, May Mobility, a leader in the development and deployment of autonomous vehicle (AV) technology, and […]]]>

The Grand Rapids, Minn. The service is accessible by design and will demonstrate how AVs achieve their greatest impact when used for public transport – even in rural and winter environments.

GRAND RAPIDS, Minn., September 28, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Today, May Mobility, a leader in the development and deployment of autonomous vehicle (AV) technology, and Via, the global leader in TransitTech, will launch the first transit project compliant with the American Disability Act (ADA) AV in Rural America.

The company’s goal for the Grand Rapids, Minn. project is to demonstrate that AVs achieve their greatest societal impact when used for public transportation. The rollout will allow anyone to book a free, on-demand, shared ride from an AV. The project will also advance AV deployments in rural terrain and diverse and sometimes harsh weather conditions.

“We are passionate about improving transportation for all, and providing innovative and accessible transportation solutions to rural communities is a key next step on that journey,” said Edwin Olson, CEO of May Mobility. “May Mobility and Via are proud to bring cutting-edge technology and services to Great Rapids with the first commercial fleet of Toyota Sienna Autono-MaaS vehicles.”

“Via is proud to partner with May Mobility for the new Great Rapids launch of the site, which advances our shared belief that AVs have the greatest impact when they are accessible, shared and complementary to a community’s public transit system,” said Israel Duanis, head of autonomous vehicles at Via. “Via is committed to supporting rural connectivity for riders of all needs. We believe that Great Rapids will serve as a pioneer in how autonomous and innovative mobility can transform the way small communities get around.”

May Mobility’s fleet in Great Rapids will mark the first commercial launch of the Toyota Sienna Autono-MaaS platform, including the first ADA-compliant versions of the vehicle the company announcement earlier this year.

Powered by Via’s AI-powered booking and routing algorithms, on-demand rides are available to everyone via the Via app (available on iOS and Android), which matches passengers heading in the same direction in a single vehicle to create efficient and flexible shared journeys. Across the city, more than 70 pick-up and drop-off locations were identified and established based on popular travel habits and community feedback, which helped shape the service area, hours of openness and other considerations. Passengers without smartphones can also book by calling 211.

Although the rides are open to everyone, they are designed to serve those without a private car or with mobility issues – with the aim of using technology to help everyone achieve a supported independent lifestyle through convenient travel, regardless of income or ability.

This project will expand access to mobility for Grand Rapids Community complementing the city’s existing fixed-route bus routes and will cover nearly 17 square miles, allowing residents and visitors to easily connect to restaurants, grocery stores, pharmacies, churches, fitness centers, and more. from the city. The service will also provide coverage on weeknights and weekends when other options are not available.

The rollout represents another step forward for May Mobility and Via’s history of introducing AV vehicles as public transportation in communities across the country and follows the launch of three other AV services in Arlington, Texas., Ann Arbour, Mich.and Grand Rapids, Mich. in 2021.

Via and May Mobility look forward to continuing to help cities and communities integrate autonomous vehicles into their public transit systems to expand access to safe, efficient, equitable and sustainable mobility.

The 18-month project, called “goMARTI,” was created, built, and deployed with support from the Minnesota Department of Transportation, the City of Grand RapidsThe PLUM Catalyst, 211 and Mobility Mania, among others.

About Via
Founded in 2012, Via has pioneered the TransitTech category in using new technologies to develop public mobility systems – optimizing networks of buses, shuttles, wheelchair accessible vehicles, school buses, autonomous and electric vehicles around the world. Building the most efficient, equitable and sustainable transport network in the world for all users – including those with reduced mobility, those without smartphones and unbanked populations – Via works with its partners to reduce the costs of public transit while providing transportation options that rival the convenience of a personal car while reducing environmental impact. At the intersection of transportation and technology, Via is a visionary market leader that combines software innovation with sophisticated service design and operational expertise to fundamentally improve the way the world moves, delivering technology in 600 communities and more than 35 countries and more.

About MayMobility
May Mobility, established in Ann Arbor, MI in 2017, built the best autonomy system in the world. Their proprietary Multi-Policy Decision-Making (MPDM) system is at the heart of their mission to help make cities safer, greener and more accessible. MPDM’s proven track record has enabled more than 320,000 autonomous rides to date in multiple transit applications across the United States and Japan. With key strategic partnerships including some of the world’s most innovative automotive and transportation companies, such as Toyota Motor Corporation, May Mobility aims to achieve the highest standards in driver safety, sustainability and fairness. transport. For more information, visit www.maymobility.com.

SOURCE May Mobility

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Banter through disability and dislocation https://taxis4smartcities.org/banter-through-disability-and-dislocation/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 10:01:56 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/banter-through-disability-and-dislocation/ A decade ago, filmmaker Daniel Poler was living in his native Venezuela and pondering what it would mean to leave. He was a twenty-year-old film student, and his homeland tended towards misery. Poler chose to emigrate. His decision remains an open wound. “It’s like someone cut a part of me off,” he said. His new […]]]>

A decade ago, filmmaker Daniel Poler was living in his native Venezuela and pondering what it would mean to leave. He was a twenty-year-old film student, and his homeland tended towards misery. Poler chose to emigrate. His decision remains an open wound. “It’s like someone cut a part of me off,” he said.

His new film, “Tuesco”, is the portrait of a Venezuelan family who understands their exile, because they also live it. The title, which translates to “all screwed up,” is a nickname for Jonathan Benaim, the film’s protagonist and the middle child of the Benaim family. Twenty-eight-year-old Jonathan requires the use of a wheelchair; as a newborn in a hospital in Caracas, he suffered from a brain infection caused by an expired needle. He now lives with his mother, grandmother and sister in Panama.

Poler met the Benaims years ago and has always been drawn to Jonathan, who “has this incredible, unique charisma”, he said. The dynamics of the Benaim family – dark humor, outspokenness, love of Teflon – never ceased to delight him. “Growing up with them, I always thought, I wish I could document that,” he said. During the pandemic, he had his chance. What he captured in ‘Tuesco’ is the bare, graceful simplicity behind something we all share: the body, its limits and desires, alone and with others.

The film opens with the morning sun in the Benaim house. There are wind chimes and chirping birds. Jonathan’s grandmother, Shulamit, takes care of the schnauzer, Squash. His mother, Carolina, comes into his room and helps him up. They bathe and dress Jonathan, help him to the bathroom, get him into the car, roll him in the grass. At first glance, the family members appear to be planets orbiting Jonathan, and it seems like caring for him is an integral part of their universe. But soon it becomes clear that Jonathan is circling alongside them, joking and berating – that each of them needs the others as well. Flanked by the Panamanian skyline, the Benaim spend a day by the ocean, prepare a meal, celebrate Shabbat. Carolina administers acupuncture to children. Jonathan’s sister, Alexandra, takes him to a club for his first drink of alcohol, which causes him to wince, then vomit. “There are people with physical disabilities who are treated like they’re children or made of crystal,” Jonathan said, contrasting that reality with his own.

For all the unity that Poler displays, there are also absences. Roberto, Jonathan’s beloved brother and Poler’s childhood friend, is thousands of miles away working in Spain, as is his half-brother, Juan Andrés. Fernando, Jonathan’s father, now lives part-time in Venezuela, trying to sell their home amid economic disaster for even a fraction of what they once paid. Incidentally, Fernando and Carolina are divorced, but they remain close friends and still live with the children, another example of Benaim’s love that Poler admires so much – one that lasts, one that is ready to evolve.

Another notable absence is something that, for many people, is a separate experience from biological family: shame. Jonathan can do few things on his own that require physical movement and therefore countless things of daily life, such as bathing, require coordination and solidarity from his family. Instead of shame in those moments, there is comedy; there is attention. Even Jonathan’s first sexual experience – a visit to a sex worker – was orchestrated by his mother and uncle. He went home to the whole Benaim team gathered to congratulate him with a banner and a cake.

The beauty of the film lies in the fact that the family, whether biological or created, is a space in which we learn to know each other. Especially for people whose bodies are seen as non-normative – disabled or not – community is of paramount importance. “I see myself as my family sees me,” says Jonathan. “It’s what makes me who I am.”

In “Tuesco”, Jonathan jokes that he’s supposed to be the “man of the house” now that his brother and father are gone, but he can’t protect the women from anything, not physically, at least. Poler argues that there is no need for verticality here. They all protect each other. And one way to do that is to joke around. “That dark humor, the way his family treats Jonathan, is very Venezuelan,” Poler said. “In Latin America, we may share this heat, but, for Venezuelans, [it’s] because of our history, our ups and downs through tragedy. Indeed, throughout “Tuesco,” the family jokes about Jonathan’s body — “as a tool not for coping, but for integrating Jonathan into what we call normalcy,” Poler said. Often it is Jonathan himself who leads the joke.

About halfway through the film, Carolina and Alexandra leave Jonathan in the middle of the bath to take care of dinner details, and, as happens in all homes, one thing leads to another, and suddenly Jonathan is forgotten, shivering in the shower. . “He’s used to being left alone and sometimes forgotten like that,” Poler said. “He starts to sing. If you leave Jonathan alone long enough, he starts singing. ♦

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JCPL Chronicle: The library relies on accessibility https://taxis4smartcities.org/jcpl-chronicle-the-library-relies-on-accessibility/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/jcpl-chronicle-the-library-relies-on-accessibility/ Davis Libraries are for everyone. Johnson County Public Library is always looking for new ways to make our buildings and resources more accessible. The library has a variety of services and tools to increase accessibility. For services, we offer both home delivery and home delivery. Curbside is for anyone who can get to the library […]]]>

Libraries are for everyone.

Johnson County Public Library is always looking for new ways to make our buildings and resources more accessible. The library has a variety of services and tools to increase accessibility.

For services, we offer both home delivery and home delivery. Curbside is for anyone who can get to the library but doesn’t want to enter. This service is ideal for parents with young children. Customers will call their branch upon arrival and staff will bring their items to their car. In addition, the library offers delivery services for anyone unable to come to the library due to disability or illness. Customers can contact their nearest JCPL branch to arrange a contactless delivery date and time to their home.

In addition to the services mentioned above, the library offers items to increase accessibility in our buildings. Each JCPL branch has the following mobility devices available for use when visiting the library: adult-sized wheelchair, rollator, shopping trolley and shopping baskets.

Each branch also has dedicated accessibility workstations or assistive technology items available for use in the library. These items include a large-print keyboard and a trackball mouse, so you can comfortably use our public computers and laptops. We also have sensory kits available for use during your visit. These kits contain a variety of items, including a snap-on mesh vest, eye mask, sensory brush, and sensory tunnel. Ask a staff member at a reception desk to borrow noise-canceling headphones for adults and children.

Our object library includes assistive technology tools that can be borrowed with a library card. These include Enchroma glasses, Ruby HD magnifier and memory kits. Enchroma glasses can help color blind people see colors without losing precision or clarity. The Ruby HD is a portable electronic magnifier that can display more text than a traditional magnifier and magnify text up to 24 times. Memory kits are available for those working with or caring for someone with dementia or other memory disorders. These kits contain items such as puzzles, games, books, CDs, DVDs and other sensory items to help the individual have a meaningful experience.

Library staff can also help you find accessible materials through our catalog, locate accessibility features in our digital resources, and use assistive technology available with our computers.

We welcome suggestions for accessibility tools or resources that customers find helpful. If you want to learn more about the library’s accessibility resources and services, visit PageAfterPage.org/accessibility. The library is a welcoming space for all.

Stefanie Davis, adult services librarian at the White River Branch Library. JCPL staff members write this bi-monthly column for the Daily Journal. Send feedback to [email protected]

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Laurelhurst residents lobby Portland city attorneys to remove homeless camp near park https://taxis4smartcities.org/laurelhurst-residents-lobby-portland-city-attorneys-to-remove-homeless-camp-near-park/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 23:26:11 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/laurelhurst-residents-lobby-portland-city-attorneys-to-remove-homeless-camp-near-park/ Every few weeks, a familiar pattern unfolds among the homeless camps that line Portland’s Laurelhurst Park. The city is sweeping. The campers are moving. In a few days, they come back. The city is sweeping again. The city of Portland issued notices Monday morning, giving campers until Thursday to move on. Dozens of people live […]]]>

Every few weeks, a familiar pattern unfolds among the homeless camps that line Portland’s Laurelhurst Park.

The city is sweeping. The campers are moving.

In a few days, they come back. The city is sweeping again.

The city of Portland issued notices Monday morning, giving campers until Thursday to move on. Dozens of people live in tents, trailers and cars along SW Oak Street near Portland’s Laurelhurst Park on July 26, 2021.

Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

For more than a year, tents, cars and shopping carts overflowing with trash have lined the streets next to one of the city’s most popular parks. The camp, which stretches from Southeast Oak Street to nearby 37th Avenue, has made headlines with housed residents decrying it as a public health nightmare and homeless campers saying there is no anywhere else to live.

After more than a year of swipes and comebacks, weary Laurelhurst residents are now trying to take matters into their own hands. An unidentified group of neighborhood residents have hired one of the most powerful lawyers in town to push the town with an unexpected legal argument: do it for the trees.

On August 22, Davis Wright Tremaine attorney John DiLorenzo, who filed a class action lawsuit earlier this month to get Portland officials to clear the city’s sidewalks of homeless camps, wrote to city ​​leaders on behalf of “concerned neighbors of Laurelhurst Park and Laurelhurst Park Annex” hinting at possible future litigation.

In the letter, which OPB obtained via public records request, DiLorenzo argued that Laurelhurst campers needed to be moved because the status quo was too dangerous. Campers, he argues, damage trees along the outer edge of the park and those trees could injure campers.

“Branches and limbs from trees are at risk of falling and pose a significant threat of serious bodily harm or death to anyone in their target area,” DiLorenzo wrote to City Attorney Robert Taylor and City Forestry Officer Jenn Cairo. “Anyone living or sleeping in the tent camps is at high risk of death or injury far greater than that of an ordinary pedestrian.

“My clients urge you to permanently clean up the tent camps that line SE Oak Street and send in licensed arborists to tend and repair city-owned trees,” DiLorenzo continued. “My clients do not want to see a senseless and tragic death or injury caused by the City’s inaction.”

Who exactly DiLorenzo’s affected customers are remains a mystery. DiLorenzo declined to identify them, noting that they had not given him permission to do so. A member of the Laurelhurst Neighborhood Association, which is increasingly aggrieved by the camps, said the group knew nothing about the letter.

DiLorenzo said his client’s goal, whoever he is, is to alert city leaders that they’re “biting on a lot of responsibility” by continuing to license the Laurelhurst camp. A future attorney, he said, could refer to that warning if a branch actually hurt one of the campers.

“If it falls, it’s disastrous,” he said of the trees. “And I wouldn’t blame the families of the people who were killed for suing the city for negligence.”

Strengthening the argument was a 19-page report that Davis Wright Tremaine commissioned from Pacific Consulting Arborists to examine the impact homeless camps were having on park trees. The report, which analyzed the health of 12 elm trees and two hackberry trees on Southeast Oak Street, said the trees were in poor condition and getting worse.

“These trees are tall, old, have flaws that have not been mitigated, and are not regularly maintained, increasing the likelihood of tree parts breaking down and hitting a person,” the arborist wrote. hired Kyle Offerdahl in the report, which includes several photos of allegedly dead or broken tree branches hanging over the encampments. “As these trees age, experience extreme weather conditions and become more prone to diseases such as Dutch elm disease, the likelihood of part of the tree failing increases. .”

The safest course, the private arborist explained, is for campers to leave.

Campers say they don’t move

People living on the tree-lined stretch of Southeast Oak Street said Monday they have no plans to move permanently.

Dozens of people live in tents, trailers and cars along SW Oak Street near Portland's Laurelhurst Park on July 26, 2021.

Dozens of people live in tents, trailers and cars along SW Oak Street near Portland’s Laurelhurst Park on July 26, 2021.

Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB

Buster Sims, who said he had been living at the site from his car for just over a month, noted that he felt safer close to nature and away from people’s doorways. Moreover, there was security in numbers. When the town crews swept the camp, he said, he and some of the other campers usually hung around a few blocks until the effort was over and then returned.

The same day DiLorenzo sent the letter and report to the city, the Portland Parks Bureau dispatched one of its own arborists to Laurelhurst. The arborist “inspected the area visually, from a distance” and found a tree that is expected to be removed soon, according to a written statement from office spokesman Mark Ross.

“[The city arborist report] did not identify tree emergencies on the SE Oak Street side where people live outdoors,” Ross wrote. “City arborists want to do a more thorough inspection of these trees and have scheduled one pending the absence of people living below them. Portland Parks & Recreation staff are ready to inspect trees when the area is safe for this job.

Ross also noted that the city will notify campers next week that they are about to be evicted again.

While many Portlanders lament that their complaints to City Hall are being ignored, DiLorenzo has proven particularly good at catching the ear of Portland’s leaders. He walked away with a $10 million settlement from the city in 2017 for alleged improper spending by the city’s utility offices.

The OPB reported last December that DiLorenzo had hired a private security firm to investigate a homeless camp near a building he owned downtown. The private security company then presented the resulting report, which detailed suspicions of drug trafficking and street corner prostitution, to the city’s police chief, deputy chief, mayor’s chief of staff. and the city attorney, among others. Within a week, the camp was swept away.

And two weeks ago, DiLorenzo filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of Portlanders with disabilities to get the city to scrap all homeless camps in Portland and move people to shelters. The lawsuit alleges the city violates the Americans with Disability Act by failing to take down tents that block sidewalks.

DiLorenzo said the ADA lawsuit and Laurelhurst’s letter are two parts of the same effort: He’s trying to convince city leaders to remove homeless camps across the city and build new shelters. urgency to move people there.

“Listen, please don’t think all I want to do is sweep the camps to make the town look good.” That’s not my goal,” he said. “The adversaries are not the homeless. It was the politicians who brought us here… and now they don’t seem to have the will to do much about it. So I try to bring them forward. »

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Mayor Mike Duggan talks Detroit Auto Show comeback after pandemic hiatus https://taxis4smartcities.org/mayor-mike-duggan-talks-detroit-auto-show-comeback-after-pandemic-hiatus/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 01:54:49 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/mayor-mike-duggan-talks-detroit-auto-show-comeback-after-pandemic-hiatus/ Mayor Mike Duggan talks about the return of the auto show to Detroit Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan stopped by the charity preview night to talk about the big return of the North American International Auto Show. DETROIT (FOX 2) – Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan stopped by to discuss the return of the North American International […]]]>

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan stopped by to discuss the return of the North American International Auto Show after a few years of hiatus due to the pandemic.

Mayor Duggan was on hand at Friday night’s charity pitch party a day before the show opened to the public and spoke about all the changes – from outdoor displays to indoor runways at Huntington Place.

“You know, I just cut the ribbon to open the show with the leadership of GM, Ford and Stellantis and what they’ve done for the city – GM with their Factory Zero, Stellantis with Jeep and Ford with the station; the city ​​is coming back,” Duggan said. “And the automakers have a lot to do with it, and it’s great to have people at the auto show again.”

Around 5,000 journalists from around the world converged on the city to cover the auto show.

FOX 2: “A (reporter) from Japan said it wasn’t the same Detroit he saw five years ago.”

“There’s more construction going on in this town than there has been in 50 years,” Duggan said. “And people who haven’t been here for two or three years say, ‘I can’t believe everything that’s new.’ And by the time the NFL Draft gets here in April 2024, we’ll be much further down the road, but tonight is a good roundup for that.

Detroit fought to keep manufacturing in the city by automakers, and many of the end results are on display at the auto show.

“You know, it’s really special and I get to talk to them – and we don’t just have the big factories, but a lot of supplier factories that the Big Three have made a point of directing to Detroit “, said Duggan. . “And now you think about what we have with this event here. I mean, it’s like going to Cedar Point. Riding on some of these rides is scary. And then you have the monster trucks in Hart Plaza, crushing the cars. The auto show is going to spread all over downtown. It’s just wonderful.

Watch the video above to learn more about the mayor, including the shift to electric vehicles and how he imagines accessibility will be for Detroit residents for them in the years to come.

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan.

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Teen faces multiple hit-and-run accident charges in North Austin https://taxis4smartcities.org/teen-faces-multiple-hit-and-run-accident-charges-in-north-austin/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:10:43 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/teen-faces-multiple-hit-and-run-accident-charges-in-north-austin/ Austin police arrested a teenager accused of fleeing a hit-and-run accident involving a man in a motorized wheelchair, leaving him with life-threatening injuries in North Austin earlier this month. Shortly before 10 a.m. on September 3, emergency responders arrived at a parking lot at 9200 N. Lamar Blvd. to find an ambulant disabled man on […]]]>
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Uber pays New Jersey $100 million after misclassifying drivers https://taxis4smartcities.org/uber-pays-new-jersey-100-million-after-misclassifying-drivers/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 20:09:42 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/uber-pays-new-jersey-100-million-after-misclassifying-drivers/ Uber paid New Jersey $100 million after an audit found the popular auto service misclassified hundreds of thousands of drivers in New Jersey, the Department of Labor and Workforce Development said. work of the state. Instead of declaring the drivers employed, the company considered them independent contractors and therefore did not offer them benefits such […]]]>
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As West Melbourne grows, poor bus services are forcing residents to rely on cars https://taxis4smartcities.org/as-west-melbourne-grows-poor-bus-services-are-forcing-residents-to-rely-on-cars/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 21:43:04 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/as-west-melbourne-grows-poor-bus-services-are-forcing-residents-to-rely-on-cars/ There is a bus stop right next to Iqbal Hossain’s house at Hoppers Crossing in South West Melbourne. But he rarely uses it. “Most of the time if someone needs the bus, they have to wait 40 to 50 minutes,” he said. If he takes the bus four kilometers from the station, it takes four […]]]>

There is a bus stop right next to Iqbal Hossain’s house at Hoppers Crossing in South West Melbourne.

But he rarely uses it.

“Most of the time if someone needs the bus, they have to wait 40 to 50 minutes,” he said.

If he takes the bus four kilometers from the station, it takes four times longer than if he had to drive – the journey takes five minutes by car or 20 minutes by bus.

“It turns over and over through all the little streets before it gets to the station, and then I often miss the connecting train,” he said.

He said that’s why most people in the Outer West avoid the bus system if they need to arrive on time.

Bus journeys in the west are, on average, almost twice as long as journeys in the city centre. (ABC News: Margaret Paul)

That’s why the train station commuter car park is full by 7 a.m. most mornings, and only 1.3% of business trips in the west include bus trips.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne found that it doesn’t have to be.

How serious is the problem?

John Stone, lecturer in transport planning at the University of Melbourne, said a population the size of Canberra is expected to add to western Melbourne over the next 15 years.

The traffic implications of this are obvious to anyone who has sat in a car on the West Gate Freeway, or heard the phrase “heavy on the Point Cook bend” on the traffic report.

A man wearing glasses sits next to a computer screen.
John Stone of the University of Melbourne is part of a team looking at public transport in the city’s west.(ABC News: Chris LePage)

“People in the West really need alternatives to driving,” Dr. Stone said.

“At the moment most people’s bus service doesn’t run in the evening, it doesn’t run on Sundays, and even at peak times it can run on 30-40 minute frequencies,” he said. -he declares.

The researchers found that the average transit time in Wyndham was 71.4 minutes, nearly double the average 37-minute journey in central Melbourne.

It should perhaps come as no surprise then that more than double the proportion of households in Wyndham own three cars compared to Melbourne’s city center – 18.3% of households compared to 8.8%.

This is something common in the outer suburbs of Melbourne.

“For a lot of people, the cost of having the third, fourth car in the household is prohibitive, so we really need better public transport,” Dr Stone said.

What can be done?

Dr. Stone’s team wanted to see what would happen if they threw away the current bus system and started over – and they were surprised at the results.

A map showing the existing bus network in West Melbourne.
The existing bus network in West Melbourne.(Provided: University of Melbourne)

Using computer modelling, they removed the 80 bus networks, which aim to stop within 400 meters of each house, meandering through suburban streets.

Instead, the researchers designed a grid-like system, with just 25 routes, running along major roads, with stops within 800m of most homes.

A depiction of a proposed new bus network for West Melbourne.
The researchers’ alternative proposal for the bus network in the west of the city.(Provided: University of Melbourne)

“For the same resources, we could give people huge accessibility improvements – they could have 10-minute services all day, seven days a week,” he said.

The trade-off is that people – like Iqbal Hossain – might have to walk a bit further to get to a bus stop.

At the moment, Public Transport Victoria aims to have a bus stop within 400m of each house.

“But a bus stop without a bus isn’t very useful to you,” Dr Stone said.

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What are the COVID-19 face mask rules for each state and territory? https://taxis4smartcities.org/what-are-the-covid-19-face-mask-rules-for-each-state-and-territory/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 05:16:35 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/what-are-the-covid-19-face-mask-rules-for-each-state-and-territory/ Last week, the national cabinet agreed to lift the mask mandate for domestic flights, as well as cut the isolation period for most COVID-19 cases from seven days to five. The new changes took effect this morning, but the mask mandates have not been fully lifted. Some jurisdictions still require masks on public transport, in […]]]>

Last week, the national cabinet agreed to lift the mask mandate for domestic flights, as well as cut the isolation period for most COVID-19 cases from seven days to five.

The new changes took effect this morning, but the mask mandates have not been fully lifted.

Some jurisdictions still require masks on public transport, in hospitals and in care homes, while others have increased face covering requirements.

Click the links below to see the mask rules for your state or territory:

LAW

Masks are mandatory in the following settings:

  • On public transportation, including a public bus, light rail vehicle, taxi, rideshare vehicle, rental car, or demand response service vehicle
  • Staff and visitors entering high-risk environments, including hospitals, aged care facilities, correctional centers and residential facilities for people who need frequent and close personal care and who are vulnerable to serious diseases
  • Staff who provide a service to a disabled person which is funded by the National Disability Insurance Scheme or provided by the Government ACT
  • Staff working for a home and community aged care provider

Household contacts of COVID-19 cases aged 12 and older should wear a mask in any indoor setting outside of their home.

New South Wales

Masks are mandatory:

  • In a public hospital or private healthcare facility (including private hospitals and day intervention centres)
  • In residential care facilities or youth hostels
  • On public transport and public transport waiting areas (including taxis and ride-sharing services)
  • In a cruise terminal

People over the age of 12 who are a household or close contact of someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should wear a face mask when indoors outside their home.

North territory

Face masks are mandatory in the following high-risk settings:

  • Hospitals and health facilities
  • Aged care facilities
  • Accommodation establishments for people with disabilities
  • correctional institutions
  • Domestic violence, sobering up and homeless shelters
  • Masks must also be worn outside the home for five days after isolation

queensland

People 12 years and older must wear a mask in the following contexts:

  • In health care facilities, seniors’ residences, housing for the disabled, prisons or detention centers
  • On public transport, including waiting on the platform or at a stop
  • In a taxi, ride-sharing vehicle, or commercial shuttle, including while waiting at a taxi rank or pick-up area

And people should wear a mask when outside their home or accommodation if:

  • They have a temperature equal to or greater than 37.5 degrees
  • They have symptoms of COVID-19
  • They are waiting for a COVID-19 PCR test result
  • If they are diagnosed with COVID-19, are a close contact, or are an international traveler (as per other public health guidelines)

People who test positive must wear a mask when leaving the house for seven days after their self-isolation period ends – this goes for indoor environments as well as outdoors when they cannot stay physically distant from others.

There are exemptions for people affected by a medical condition or disability.

southern australia

Wearing a mask is compulsory for all people in the following contexts:

  • Health services
  • Pharmacies
  • Disability care facilities
  • Residential facilities for the elderly
  • Passenger transport services – buses, trains, trams, taxis, carpooling and other vehicle rental or charter arrangements

If you are a close contact, you must wear a mask when you leave the house for seven days after exposure.

Tasmania

Mask mandates have been greatly reduced, but masks are still required for the following people:

  • Close contacts of COVID-19 cases, in any indoor space outside your home
  • Confirmed cases of COVID-19, in circumstances where they may come into contact with, or expose others to, COVID-19

Victoria

People aged eight and over should wear masks in the following settings:

  • In public transport, in taxis/ride-sharing services and in passenger vehicles
  • When visiting a hospital, healthcare facility or any other publicly accessible indoor space in a healthcare facility, including paramedical facilities
  • In a public indoor space if you are a close contact of a COVID-19 case
  • Work in an indoor space that is a publicly accessible area of ​​a court or justice center
  • Work in a resident-facing role in an interior space of a care facility, including when not interacting with residents
  • Work in an indoor space of a prison, police jail, remand center, residential youth center, youth justice center or post-sentence facility
  • After being tested for COVID-19 and awaiting results
  • If you have COVID-19 or are a close or family contact and are cleared to leave quarantine (for example, because you tested negative in a rapid antigen test)

Western Australia

Masks will only be required in high-risk environments such as:

  • Hospitals
  • Healthcare Parameters
  • Facilities for Remedial Services
  • Residential Elderly Care
  • Disabled Services
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Mutations in the COVID-19 virus continue to pose a risk.

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Backgrounder: North Carolina Strategic Transportation Investment Act https://taxis4smartcities.org/backgrounder-north-carolina-strategic-transportation-investment-act/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 13:03:32 +0000 https://taxis4smartcities.org/backgrounder-north-carolina-strategic-transportation-investment-act/ See also The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) will provide more than $300 billion in highway funding to state departments of transportation (DOT).1 Under federal law, state DOTs are responsible for transportation system planning and project selection. The US Department of Transportation primarily serves as a passive funder.2 In fact, when it comes to […]]]>

See also

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) will provide more than $300 billion in highway funding to state departments of transportation (DOT).1 Under federal law, state DOTs are responsible for transportation system planning and project selection. The US Department of Transportation primarily serves as a passive funder.2 In fact, when it comes to spending federal formula dollars, state DOTs have a “sovereign right…to determine which projects will be funded by the federal government.”3 States’ choices will significantly determine the extent to which the IIJA will advance inclusive growth and environmental sustainability.




Yet many states have constitutional provisions, laws and rules that limit how highway funds can be spent, requiring state and federal highway dollars to support projects designed to move more cars and trucks. excluding public transport, cycling and walking. According to the American Association of State Highways and Transportation Officials, 27 states have either a constitutional provision or law that limits the use of fuel tax revenues to highway and highway projects.4

North Carolina’s Strategic Transportation Investment (STI) Act focuses heavily on expanding freeways, locking in extra vehicle miles traveled and increasing emissions rather than building facilities that would provide people with safe, sustainable and affordable alternatives to driving. In fact, since 2018, 94% of all funding subject to TSI has gone to road projects focused on construction and expansion.5

The North Carolina Legislature should reform ITS to elevate transportation projects that move people safely and efficiently as opposed to projects that focus on vehicle throughput. The following 14 project selection criteria would help the North Carolina Department of Transportation prioritize projects that would provide safe, affordable, sustainable, and equitable mobility:

  • Historical capital/divestment: A measurement of historical patterns of discrimination, disinvestment, and geographic isolation, with the goal of redressing historical inequalities and barriers to opportunity.
  • Household transportation costs: A measure of the cost of transportation, which is the second largest expense after housing for most Americans. Its objective is to reduce household spending on transportation primarily by reducing reliance on driving and the need to own a private vehicle.
  • Greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions: A measure of total and per capita GHG emissions, with the goal of eliminating GHG emissions from surface transportation.
  • Vehicle mileage traveled: A measure of the total and per capita amount of driving each year, with the aim of reducing vehicle kilometers driven both per capita and on a total basis.
  • Network connectivity: A measure of the extent to which the surface transportation system provides alternative routes or directs users to a limited number of arterial road corridors. Better network connectivity generally reduces distances traveled and congestion. The objective of this measure is to increase network connectivity.
  • Efficiency/people flow: A measure of the number of people moving through a corridor in a particular time interval. Transit and non-motorized facilities move more people in a corridor than facilities designed to primarily serve automobiles. The objective of the measure is to increase the flow of people in the transport corridors.
  • Non-motorized mode sharing: A measure of the percentage of trips taken other than by car or public transport, with the aim of increasing the share of trips taken by bicycle and on foot.
  • Sharing mode of transportation: A measure of the percentage of trips taken by public transport, with the aim of increasing the share of trips taken by public transport.
  • Accessibility of public transport: A measure of the share of jobs, housing and essential services that can be reached by public transit in a given travel time, such as 45 minutes. Greater accessibility to public transit increases ridership. The objective is to increase the share of jobs, housing and essential services accessible by public transit within a reasonable travel time.
  • Average distance to transit: A measure of the average distance between transit lines and commercial and residential lots. Greater proximity to public transit services increases ridership. This measure aims to reduce the average distance to high-frequency public transit service.
  • Transit progress: A measure of wait times between transit vehicles during peak and off-peak periods. A frequent transit service is a useful transit service. The objective of the measure is to reduce transit trips.
  • Non-motorized installations: A measure of the presence of infrastructure dedicated to non-motorized users, with the aim of increasing the share of roads with dedicated and robust non-motorized infrastructure and traffic control systems.
  • Security: A measure of the extent to which a project would reduce serious injuries and fatalities with additional weight given to projects that would reduce injuries and fatalities to vulnerable road users. The aim is to reduce serious injuries and fatalities from transport accidents, especially those involving vulnerable users.
  • Asset conditions: Measuring the state of disrepair of surface transportation facilities, including roads, bridges, transit vehicles and related facilities, with the goal of increasing the share of transportation facilities in good condition.

Conclusion

It’s time for North Carolina to overhaul STI. Without reform, STI will continue to channel about 94% of surface transportation spending to highway projects with a focus on expansion. This will lock down driving and automobile addiction for decades to come. The state legislature should adopt evaluation criteria that elevate transportation projects that move people safely and efficiently as opposed to projects that focus on vehicle throughput. In short, STI should reward regions and projects that provide safe, affordable, sustainable and fair mobility.

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